Episode 40: Heber C. Kimball

Written by Lindsay Hansen Park on . Posted in year of polygamy

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Comments (5)

  • Noell Hyman

    |

    Amazing stories. I could listen to another hour of the three of you. Thank you!

    Reply

  • Jan Forsyth

    |

    Fascinating. Very thought provoking. Lindsay also did a great job moderating.

    Reply

  • Michelle

    |

    I started listening to these podcasts several weeks ago and am slowly working my way througn this history. I have trusted you from the very beginning, Lindsay, that everything would be ok and I am still holding you to that. I have heard throughout my adult years a few “watered-down” versions of some of these stories but nothing as honest and true as what you have collected and presented thus far. First, thank you for pouring your heart and soul into this project – it does come through. As soon as I am done I am going to start reading.

    Second, this particular podcast really summed up a lot of what I have felt over the past couple of months. I have had my eyes opened, truly opened, and feel like I am hearing about plural marriage really for the first time. I have ancestors that practiced plural marriage and knew in our church history that it was practiced, but never cared to understand the how’s and the what’s. I do believe that there are many in our church who do not wish to know the seedy details of what went on in early church history. Either that or they do not a believe it. I believe that many, like Bill McGee pointed out, start reading the histories and honestly cannot handle the brutalness of it and they put it away because it is so very difficult to make sense of it with what we have believed all our lives. For me, I cannot put these histories aside and ignore how we began as a church. I have wanted to ask several times of you, Lindsay, how you have made peace with all that you have learned. You actually mentioned it a bit here in this podcast and for that little bit I am grateful. I am still waiting to make peace with this. I am still not sure how this huge paradigm shift will affect me in the end. But I am seeing this through because I want to know and I need to know these stories.

    Finally, I have gone from feelings of shock to disbelief to understanding to sadness and back again. I have felt mislead and misinformed and see things so differently now. Its difficult, yes, but I would much rather know the truth, as painful and hard as it is, so that I can choose to accept even when I cannot understand. I wonder sometimes if I had heard these stories at some earlier time in my life if it would have had an impact on me. Perhaps not, since I am older now and have my own children. This is the right time for me to learn this, so thank you again for the time and effort you have put into it, probably sacraficing time with your own family.

    Onward and upward I go.

    Reply

  • Nancy

    |

    The book Tom Kimball couldn’t remember was called “a Mormon Mother” by Annie Clark Tanner. I read it in the early 80’s. Her youngest so was OC Tanner – (yes the jewelry company her in Salt Lske valley. That book opened my eyes to the realities of being a plural wife. These women were essentially single moms. I realized then if I was going to stay in the church. I couldn’t read any kind of truthful account of Mormon history. How I lasted another 35 years is a mystery yo me. None of the stories I have heard have surprised me at all, I’m sad to say. Why do church leaders think we can suspend every critical thinking skill we have to believe their truth claims? Yet that is what I had to do to stay an active member, until I couldn’t do it anymore. Leaders biggest downfall will the belief they cling to that everyone who leaves the church just wasn’t faithful enough in following the rules.

    Reply

  • David

    |

    Im related to this guy hes my 8th great grandfather.

    Reply

Leave a comment