Episode 45: Houses of Polygamy

Written by Lindsay Hansen Park on . Posted in Uncategorized

Comments (3)

  • Liffey Banks

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    This was so interesting! I’m heartbroken about the Gardo house. I lived in an old house in Maryland that we saved from demolition, funny enough, by the LDS church! They owned the house, which was built as early as the 1840s, and wanted to build a chapel there. My parents staged a neighborhood protest to keep the building from being demolished. The church finally agreed to sell us the old house as long as we moved it off the property, so we did! We plopped the 4-story Victorian on some airplane wheels and verrrrry slowwwly moved it next-door onto a new foundation. Then we spent the next 10 years fixing the house, stripping wall paper, installing plumbing and electricity, modernizing the walls and ceilings, and falling in love with the old house. We were devastated when we had to leave to move to Utah. Now my heart breaks every time I hear about an old house that got mowed down.

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  • andrew h

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    Great episode Lindsay, may I offer a couple of clarifications?

    You mentioned that Brigham’s first wife Miriam died in Nauvoo. She actually died shortly after she and Brigham arrived in Kirtland, Ohio in 1832 or 1833 (Sorry, I’m at lunch and I am going off of memory).

    Also, when speaking of the Gardo house being built you referenced one of Brigham’s daughters Susa Young Gates. I may have heard the podcast wrong, but it sounded like you said Susan. Just in case anyone else heard it wrong like I did I figured I would throw that out there.

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  • andrew h

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    A couple of fun Lion House

    Once an actual lion, a mountain lion, got into the lion house. It cornered one of Brigham’s daughters, Susa Young, who was 7 and her baby sister Rhoda in a room in the first floor. Everyone was quite scared but got out alright.

    Details here:

    http://www.keepapitchinin.org/2008/07/15/here-kitty-kitty-or-the-lions-of-the-lion-house/

    In the late 1950s early 60s the Church was going to raze the Lion House and put an important parking lot where it was. Florence Jacobsen, the Young Womens president, did something women are discouraged from doing, she stood up to 5he First Presidency and said no. She went to Henry Moyle, a counselor to David O McKay and challenged him stating that he only wanted to destroy it because it reminded the world of Polygamy and he was embarrassed by it. He admitted that she was correct. Shortly after that he died and Jacobsen convinced the First Presidency to preserve the Lion House. More details here:

    http://www.keepapitchinin.org/2013/04/02/guest-post-florence-smith-jacobsen-saving-our-material-heritage/

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